Huh?

I saw the following ad on proz.com:

“We have been asked to possibly provide some transliteration for a client.
It is a project which would entail taking software code (US) and translating code into Russian for their central bank processing.”

They want a translator to do WHAT?
The poster has an amazing mess in his/her head.

They do not distinguish transliteration from translation. For those less familiar with these terms, transliteration means rendering a word in the characters of another language preserving the actual word. Contrary to what some people think, transliterating a word does not instantly make it understandable by the speakers of the language with target character set. I mean, if you transliterate Russian собака (a dog) into English, it will become “sobaka” and not “dog”. Translation, on the other hand, means that a word is replaced with a word from another language, e.g. “dog”->”chien”.

And how on earth can you translate source code? “For central bank processing”, not less? Evidently, if a source code undergoes either of the two procedures I described (transliteration or translation), it will compile no more. Amazing. Do the authors of the job post really think that “these Russians” have their very own special programming language in Russian, so, for a software to work in Russia, its source code must be transliterated/translated into Russian? (From “US language”, I have no doubt.) And a very own Russian compiler to go with it. With a built-in central bank.

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